Voter ID Laws

Alabama

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in Alabama with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- Expects to be absent from the county on election day
- Is ill or has a physical disability that prevents a trip to the polling place
- Is a registered Alabama voter living outside the country, such as a member of the armed forces, a voter employed outside the United States, a college student, or a spouse or child of such a person
- Is an appointed election officer or poll watcher at a polling place other than his or her regular polling place
- Expects to work a required shift, 10-hours or more, that coincides with polling hours
- Is a caregiver for a family member to the second degree of kinship by affinity or consanguinity and the family member is confined to his or her home
- Is currently incarcerated in prison or jail and has not been convicted of a felony involving moral turpitude

Photo ID is required to vote in Alabama. Valid forms of ID include:
- Valid Alabama Driver’s License (not expired or has been expired less than 60 days)
- Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Digital Driver’s License
- Valid Alabama Nondriver ID (not expired or has been expired less than 60 days)
- Alabama Law Enforcement Agency Digital Nondriver ID
- Valid Alabama Photo Voter ID Card
- Valid State-Issued ID (Alabama or any other state)
Examples
- Valid AL Department of Corrections Release - Temporary ID (Photo Required)
- Valid AL Movement/Booking Sheet from Prison/Jail System (Photo Required)
- Valid Pistol Permit (Photo Required)
- Valid Federal-Issued ID
- Valid US passport
- Valid Employee ID from Federal Government, State of Alabama, County, Municipality, Board, or other entity of this state
- Valid student or employee ID from a public or private college or university in the State of Alabama (including postgraduate technical or professional schools)
- Digital student ID from a public or private college or university in the State of Alabama (including postgraduate technical or professional schools)
- Valid student or employee ID issued by a state institution of higher learning in any other state
- Digital student ID issued by a state institution of higher learning in any other state
- Valid Military ID
- Valid Tribal ID

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can obtain a free Alabama photo voter ID at these locations. If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you will be able to vote a provisional ballot. You will have until 5pm on the Friday after the election to submit valid photo identification; otherwise, your provisional ballot will not be counted.

Alabama offers in-person absentee voting. Voters can request their absentee ballots and cast their in-person absentee ballots at their local absentee ballot office during regular business hours beginning 55 days before the Election. In-person absentee voting ends 5 days before the Election.

You can pre-register to vote in Alabama if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Alabama has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party, although you will have to declare a political party preference in order to vote in a partisan primary. Voters who participate in a party's primary may only vote in that party's runoff election; voters who do not participate in a partisan primary may vote in either runoff election. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Alabama does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Alaska

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Alaska; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required to vote in Alaska. Valid forms of ID include:
-Voter ID card
- Driver’s license
- State ID
- Military ID
- Passport
- Hunting or fishing license
- Other current or valid photo ID

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you may present:
- A current utility bill or paycheck
- A government check or bank statement
- Other government issued document

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you may be asked to vote a questioned ballot. You will sign a questioned ballot register and complete a questioned ballot envelope with your information. You will then vote your ballot, place it inside a secrecy sleeve and then place it inside of the questioned ballot envelope. The questioned ballot will go to a review board who will determine if your ballot can be counted. The information on the outside of the envelope is used to register you to vote or update your registration information (when applicable). A letter will be sent to you if your ballot was rejected or partially counted to tell you the reason.

Alaska offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 15 days prior to Election Day and ends on Election Day.

You can pre-register to vote in Alaska if you are within 90 days of your 18th birthday.

Alaska has open primaries, as a nonpartisan top 4 primary is used to determine the top four vote getters that will advance to the General Election, regardless of political affiliation. For Republican presidential primaries, Republicans, nonpartisans, and undeclared voters may participate. For Democratic/Independence Party presidential primaries, any registered voter may participate, regardless of political party. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election, except for the Democratic/Independence Party presidential primary.

Alaska does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Arizona

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Arizona; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required
to vote in Arizona. There are three ways of fulfilling the ID requirement:

List #1: Submit one document from the following list:
- Valid Arizona driver's license
- Valid Arizona non-driver identification
- Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification
- Valid U.S. federal, state or local government issued identification

List #2: If you don’t have any of the documents from List #1, you can show two documents from the following list:
- Utility bill of the elector that is dated within 90 days of the date of the election
- Bank or credit union statement that is dated within 90 days of the date of the election
- Valid Arizona Vehicle Registration
- Indian census card
- Property tax statement of the elector's residence
- Tribal enrollment card or other form of tribal identification
- Arizona vehicle insurance card
- Recorder's Certificate
- Valid United States federal, state, or local government-issued identification, including a voter registration card issued by the County Recorder
- Any mailing to the elector marked “Official Election Material”

List #3: If you don’t have two documents from List #2, you can show:
- Any valid photo identification from List 1 in which the address does not reasonably match the precinct register accompanied by a non-photo identification from List 2 in which the address does reasonably match the precinct register
- U.S. Passport without address and one valid item from List 2
- U.S. Military identification without address and one valid item from List 2

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can vote using a conditional provisional ballot. This ballot will be valid and counted as long you provide valid identification to your polling location before 7:00 pm on Election Day. Alternatively, you have up to five business days after a general election and three business days after any other election to provide your identification to your county elections office.

Arizona offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 27 days before Election Day and ends on the Friday before Election Day.

You can pre-register to vote in Arizona if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Arizona has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party. For a Presidential Preference Election (PPE), only voters registered with a participating party can vote as Arizona does not classify a PPE as a primary election. For primaries, registered independent voters may choose one party's primary ballot to vote on and will remain independent for future elections. Voters enrolled with a party must vote in their party’s primary.17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Arizona does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Arkansas

COVID-19 UPDATE: All voters may use the excuse “physical illness/disability” to request an absentee ballot.

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in Arkansas with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include if:
- You will be unavoidably absent from your polling site on election day
- You will be unable to attend your polling site on election day due to illness or physical disability
- You are a member of the Uniformed Services, merchant marines or the spouse or a dependant family member and are away from your polling location due to the member’s active duty status
- A U.S. citizen whose residence is in Arkansas but is temporarily living outside the territorial limits of the United States

Photo ID is required to vote in Arkansas.

Valid forms of ID include:
- Driver's license.
- Photo identification card
- Concealed handgun carry license
- United States passport
- Employee badge or identification document issued by an accredited postsecondary educational institution in the State of Arkansas
- United States military identification document
- Public assistance identification card if the card shows a photograph of the person to whom the document or identification card was issued
- Voter verification card under § 7-5-324.

A person who is a resident of a long-term care or residential care facility licensed by the state of Arkansas is not required to verify his or her registration by presenting a document or identification card as described above when voting in person, but must provide documentation from the administrator of the facility attesting that the person is a resident of the facility.

Note: A document or identification card may be presented in a digital format on an electronic device if it complies with other requirements and has been approved or issued by the U.S., the state of Arkansas, or an accredited post-secondary educational institution.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can vote a provisional ballot. Provisional ballots cast in this manner will be counted if:

(a) The voter completes a sworn statement at the polling site stating that the voter is registered to vote in this state and that he or she is the person registered to vote, and the county board of election commissioners does not determine that the provisional ballot is invalid and should not be counted based on other grounds, or

(b) The voter returns to the county board of election commissioners or the county clerk by 12:00 noon on the Monday following the election and presents a document or identification card meeting the requirements described above, and the county board of election commissioners does not determine that the provisional ballot is invalid and should not be counted based on other grounds.

Arkansas offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Depending on the type of election being conducted, you may vote early during the 7 or 15 days prior to Election Day.

You can pre-register to vote in Arkansas if you will turn 18 before the next election.

Arkansas has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Arkansas does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

If you registered to vote but your name does not appear on the precinct voter registration list, or if you are unable to comply with identification requirements, you have the right to cast a Provisional Ballot after signing an affirmation that you are a registered voter in the county and are eligible to vote in that election.

California

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in California; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in California, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters.

Some counties in California offer early/in-person absentee. Contact your county elections office to see if they offer early voting.

You can pre-register to vote in California when you turn 16.

In California, presidential primaries are closed. For all other primaries, California uses a top-two primary system that allows voters to choose among all candidates running for each office. The two candidates who receive the most votes in the Primary Election qualify for the General Election. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in California but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place during the early voting period or on Election Day.

All registered voters in the state will receive mail ballots automatically for the November 3 general election.

Colorado

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Colorado; no excuse is needed. All registered voters in Colorado should automatically receive absentee/vote-by-mail ballots at the address where they are registered.

If you are voting in person at a voter service and polling center, an ID is required to vote in Colorado. If you are voting by mail for the first time, you may also need to provide a photocopy of your ID with your mail ballot. Valid forms of ID include:
- A valid Colorado driver’s license or valid identification card issued by the Colorado Department of Revenue. (Note: documents issued to not lawfully present and temporarily lawfully present individuals under Part 5 of Article 2 of Title 42, C.R.S. are not acceptable forms of identification.)
- A valid U.S. passport.
- A valid employee identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. government or of Colorado, or by any county, municipality, board, authority, or other political subdivision of Colorado.
- A valid pilot’s license issued by the federal aviation administration or other authorized agency of the U.S.
- A valid U.S. military identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector.
- A copy of a current (within the last 60 days) utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document that shows the name and address of the elector.
- A Certificate of Degree of Indian or Alaskan Native Blood.
- A valid Medicare or Medicaid card issued by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services.
- A certified copy of a U.S. birth certificate for the elector.
- Certified documentation of naturalization.
- A valid student identification card with a photograph of the eligible elector issued by an institute of higher education in Colorado, as defined in section 23-3.1-102(5), C.R.S..
- A valid veteran identification card issued by the U.S. department of veterans affairs veterans health administration with a photograph of the eligible elector.
- A valid identification card issued by a federally recognized tribal government certifying tribal membership

Any form of identification listed above that shows your address must show a Colorado address to qualify as an acceptable form of identification.

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can receive a free Colorado ID from the DMV.

If you go to a voter service and polling center without an approved form of ID, you may cast a provisional ballot. Your provisional ballot is counted if you complete the provisional ballot affidavit and the election official confirms your eligibility to vote.

Colorado offers in-person early voting. Voters do not need an excuse to vote early in-person. Early voting begins no more than 15 days before election day, and may vary by county.

You can pre-register to vote in Colorado when you turn 16.

Colorado has semi-open primaries. Voters registered with a particular political party can vote in that party’s primary, as can unaffiliated voters. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Colorado but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at the voter service and polling center in your county through Election Day.

Connecticut

COVID-19 UPDATE: All voters may use the excuse “COVID-19” to request an absentee ballot for Primary, Election, or Referendum held prior to November 3, 2021.

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in Connecticut with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- you are an active member of the armed forces of the United States
- you will be out of town during all the hours of voting on Election Day
- illness will prevent you from voting in person on Election Day
- your religious beliefs will prevent you from performing secular activities like voting on Election Day
- you will be performing duties as an election official at a polling place other than your own during all the hours of voting on Election Day
- you have have a physical disability that prevents you from voting in person on Election Day

ID is required to vote in Connecticut. Valid forms of ID include:
- Social security card
- Any pre-printed form of identification that shows your name and address, or name and signature, or name and photograph

If you go to your polling place without one of the forms of ID as described above, you can vote a regular ballot by signing an affidavit in lieu of ID.

If you are a first time voter who registered by mail after January 1, 2003, and are voting for the first time in an primary/election with federal candidates on the ballot, and have a "mark" next to your name on the official registry list, you must present one of the following:
- A copy of a current and valid photo identification that shows your name and address
- A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or government document that shows your name and address

If you are required to present the above ID at the polls and do not do so, you can vote a provisional ballot.

Connecticut does not offer early in-person voting. However, voters can return their absentee ballots in person at the Town Clerk’s office, or via the secure drop box that the Office of the Secretary of the State has provided to each town.

You can pre-register to vote in Connecticut if you are at least 17 and will turn 18 by the next election.

Connecticut has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Connecticut but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at a designated Election Day registration location in your town on Election Day.

Election Day Registration is not available at your polling place, but is available at a designated EDR location in each town, beginning at 6 am and ending at 8 pm. You will register and vote at the designated EDR location in your town.

Delaware

Voters can only vote absentee in Delaware with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- If you are in public service of the U.S. or Delaware, or a spouse or dependent residing with or accompanying him or her. Reason 1 also applies to members of the Uniformed Services.
- If you are away due to the nature of your business or occupation. Reason 2 also applies to persons providing care to a parent, spouse or child who is living at home and requires constant care, students, and otherwise eligible persons who are incarcerated.
- If you are sick, or temporarily or permanently physically disabled
- If you are absent from the district while on vacation
- If you are kept from voting on Election Day due to tenets or teachings of your religion
- If you are temporarily residing outside of the U.S. and the District of Columbia, or are a spouse or dependent residing with or accompanying him or her.

Note: if you fall under the final reason you will receive a full Primary Election ballot, but your General Election ballot will only have Federal Offices. Citizens temporarily residing outside of the U.S. should use the Federal Post Card Application instead of the Absentee Ballot application.

ID is not required to vote in Delaware, but you will be asked for it at the polls. Valid forms of ID include:
- Delaware Drivers License or State ID
- U. S. Passport
- Signed Polling Place or Social Security Card
- Signed vehicle registration
- Signed credit card with photo
- A similar document that identifies the person by photo or signature

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can sign an affidavit affirming your identity and then vote normally.

Delaware does not currently offer early voting. Early voting will be available starting in 2022.

You can pre-register to vote in Delaware when you are 16 years old.

Delaware has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Delaware does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

District of Columbia

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in the District of Columbia; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in D.C. However, some polling places require ID to enter the facility. It is therefore encouraged that you take some form of identification with you to vote.

You must also show proof of residence if you are a first-time voter who did not submit ID upon registration, or if you are registering during the early voting period or on Election Day. Valid forms of proof of residence include:
- Copy and valid District of Columbia DMV-issued ID
- Government check or paycheck (the issue date must be within 90 days of Election Day)
- Bank statement (the statement date must be within 90 days of Election Day)
- Current utility bill (does not include cell phone; the bill date must be within 90 days of Election Day)
- Student housing statement/tuition bill
- Homeless shelter occupancy statement
- Lease
- Other government document that shows your name and address

If you were required to show ID but go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can cast a Special Ballot. At 5:00 pm on the second day after each election, you can go to the Board’s website, www.dcboe.org, or call 1-866-DC VOTES (1-866-328-6837), to learn of the Board’s preliminary determination to either count or reject your Special Ballot. If necessary, you may challenge the Board’s decision not to count your Special Ballot by scheduling a hearing that will take place on the Thursday after Election Day.

DC offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins no more than 12 days before the election. Early vote locations and hours of operation are set by the DC Board of Elections.

You can pre-register to vote in D.C. when you turn 16.

D.C. has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in D.C. but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at early voting centers during the early voting period or at your polling place on Election Day.

Florida

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Florida; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required to vote in Florida. Valid forms of ID include:
- Florida driver’s license
- Florida identification card issued by the Department of Highway Safety and Motor Vehicles
- United States passport
- Debit or credit card
- Military identification
- Student identification
- Retirement center identification
- Neighborhood association identification
- Public assistance identification
- Veteran health identification card issued by the United States Department of Veterans Affairs
- License to carry a concealed weapon or firearm
- Employee identification card issued by any branch, department, agency, or entity of the Federal Government, the state, a county, or a municipality.

If your photo ID does not include your signature, you will be asked to provide another ID that has your signature.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can still vote a provisional ballot. As long as you are eligible and voted in the proper precinct, your provisional ballot will count provided the signature on your provisional ballot matches the signature in your registration record.

Florida offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins on the 10th day before the election and ends on the 3rd day before the election.

You can pre-register to vote in Florida when you turn 16.

Florida has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Florida does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Georgia

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Georgia; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required to vote in Georgia. Valid forms of ID include:
- Any valid state or federal government issued photo ID, including a free ID Card issued by your county registrar's office or the Georgia Department of Driver Services (DDS)
- A Georgia Driver's License, even if expired
- Valid employee photo ID from any branch, department, agency, or entity of the U.S. Government, Georgia, or any county, municipality, board, authority or other entity of this state
- Valid U.S. passport ID
- Valid U.S. military photo ID
- Valid tribal photo ID

If you do not have an approved form of ID, the State of Georgia offers a free ID Card. An ID card can be issued at any county registrar's office or Department of Driver Services Office free of charge. To receive a voter identification card, you must provide:
- A photo identity document or approved non-photo identity document that includes full legal name and date of birth
- Documentation showing the voter's date of birth
- Evidence that the applicant is a registered voter
- Documentation showing the applicant's name and residential address

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can vote a provisional ballot. You will have three days from the close of the polls to present acceptable identification to
your county registrar office for your vote to count.

Georgia offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins on the fourth Monday prior to election and ends on the Friday immediately prior to Election Day.

You can pre-register to vote in Georgia when you turn 17 ½.

Georgia has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Georgia does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Hawaii

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Hawaii; no excuse is needed. Beginning with the 2020 Elections, all registered voters will automatically receive a ballot in the mail.

ID is not required to vote in Hawaii, although voters may be asked to show ID if voting at the polls to expedite the check-in process. Hawaii Administrative Rule §3-177-550 allows a voter to confirm their identity by reciting or providing on an application personal information, such as date of birth, that is verified with the voter registration database.

Voters do not need an excuse to vote early/in-person absentee.

You can pre-register to vote in Hawaii when you turn 16.

Hawaii has open primaries for congressional and state elections. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party. Hawaii does not conduct a presidential primary. 17-year-olds cannot participate in primaries even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Hawaii but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at a voter service center during the early voting period or on Election Day.

Idaho

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Idaho; no excuse is needed.

Either providing photo ID or signing an affidavit is required
to vote in Idaho. Valid forms of ID include:
- An Idaho driver’s license or Idaho photo identification card.
- A U.S. passport or Federal photo identification card.
- A tribal photo identification card.
- A current student photo ID, issued by an Idaho high school or post secondary education institution.
- A license to carry a concealed weapon issued by a county sheriff in Idaho.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can sign a Personal Identification Affidavit and then vote a regular ballot.

Voters do not need an excuse to vote early/in-person absentee.

You can pre-register to vote in Idaho if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Idaho has semi-open and closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. A voter may only participate in the primary election of the political party for which they are registered, unless a party allows unaffiliated voters and/or voters registered with other parties to also participate in their primary. Unaffiliated voters can participate in all congressional and state primaries as well as Democratic presidential primaries, but only registered Republicans can participate in Republican presidential primaries. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Idaho has semi-open and closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. A voter may only participate in the primary election of the political party for which they are registered, unless a party allows unaffiliated voters and/or voters registered with other parties to also participate in their primary. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Idaho but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place on Election Day by providing proof of residence.

All documents used in providing proof of residence shall be accompanied with a photo I.D. Only the following documents showing the registrant’s current address in the precinct are authorized:
- a valid Idaho driver’s license issued through the department of transportation
- a valid Idaho identification card issued through the department of transportation
- any document which contains a valid address in the precinct together with a picture identification card
- Students may also use a current valid student identification card from a post secondary educational institution in Idaho accompanied with a current student fee statement that contains the student’s valid address in the precinct together with a picture identification card.

Illinois

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Illinois; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in Illinois. However, if you are registering to vote during Grace Period registration, you must provide two forms of ID. If you register by mail, your identity is sufficiently proven by submission of your driver's license number or State identification card number. If you do not have either of those, you must provide at the polls two forms of ID, one of which must show your address that you are registering from. Valid forms of ID include:
- A current and valid photo identification
- Utility bill
- Bank statement
- Government check
- Paycheck
- Student ID accompanied by a copy of your contract, a lease for a residence, or mail addressed to you at your current residence address
- Other government document that shows your name and address

If you are required to show ID at the polls but do not bring it, you can vote with a provisional ballot and submit additional information to the election authority no later than the close of business on the Tuesday following the election. The election authority has 14 days following the election to determine voter eligibility, and thus if the ballot should be counted. The provisional voter may find out if their ballot was counted, or if it was not counted, the reason that it was not counted. If the ballot is not counted, the provisional voter affidavit will be used as a registration application and the voter will be sent a voter registration ID card.

Illinois offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins on the 40th day before the election and ends on the day before the election.

You can pre-register to vote in Illinois if you will turn 17 by the next primary election and 18 by the next general election.

Illinois has open primaries. In a primary election, you must select one political party ballot to vote or request a non-partisan ballot (public questions only) if available. You have the freedom to change your party choice in each primary election. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Illinois but have not yet registered, you can register and vote during Grace Period registration, which begins on the 27th day before the election. You can register during the Grace Period at the office of the election authority or at a permanent polling place established by the election authority. You can also register at any early voting location beginning 15 days before the election, at some polling places on Election Day, or at another specially-designated location.

Indiana

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in Indiana with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- You have a specific, reasonable expectation that you will be absent from the county on Election Day during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open (6 am until 6 pm)
- You have a disability
- You are at least 65 years of age
- You will have official election duties outside of your voting precinct
- You are scheduled to work at your regular place of employment during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open
- You will be confined due to illness or injury or you will be caring for an individual confined due to illness or injury during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open
- You are prevented from voting because of a religious discipline or religious holiday during the entire 12 hours that the polls are open
- You are a participant in the state's address confidentiality program
- You are a member of the military or a public safety officer
- You are a "serious sex offender" as defined in Indiana Code 35-42-4-14(a)
- You are prevented from voting due to the unavailability of transportation to the polls

Photo ID is required to vote in Indiana. Valid forms of ID must:
- Display your photo
- Display your name, and the name must conform to your voter registration record. Conform does not mean identical.
- Display an expiration date and either be current or have expired sometime after the date of the last General Election. NOTE: An ID issued by the US Department of Defense, a branch of the uniformed services, the Merchant Marine, the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs (or Veterans Administration), or the Indiana National Guard is not required to have an expiration date, or may state that the document has an "Indefinite" expiration date.
- Be issued by the State of Indiana or the U.S. government

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you are entitled to receive a free Indiana State ID Card from the BMV. If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you may cast a provisional ballot. Upon casting a provisional ballot, you have until noon 10 days after the election to follow up with the County Election Board and either provide photo ID or affirm one of the law's exemptions applies to you.

Exemptions do exist for the indigent, those with a religious objection to being photographed, and those living in state-licensed facilities that serve as their precinct's polling place.
- If you are wishing to claim an exemption from the photo ID requirement based on indigence or a religious objection, you may do so in one of two ways: 1, go the polls on Election Day, and cast a provisional ballot. Within 10 days of the election, visit the county election office and affirm that an exemption applies to you. Or, 2, vote absentee-in-person at the county election office before Election Day, and while there, affirm that an exemption applies to you.
- If you are a resident at a state-licensed facility that serves as your polling place, you may claim the exemption at the polls on Election Day.
- If you are a resident of a state-licensed facility that serves as a satellite absentee voting office, you may claim the exemption when voting absentee before election day.

Voters do not need an excuse to vote early/in-person absentee.

You can pre-register to vote in Indiana if you will turn 18 by the next general or municipal election.

Indiana has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party. If you are affiliated with either the Democratic Party or the Republican Party, you are entitled to vote for candidates of that party at the primary election. However, you must state which party you are affiliated with by asking the poll workers for the ballot of that party. You may only vote for candidates in the party whose ballot you select. If you are not affiliated with either of these two parties, you are still entitled to vote on a public question that is held on the same day as the primary without asking for a party ballot. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election, although they may have to vote a special ballot that does not include all of the same questions as the regular ballot.

Indiana does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Iowa

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Iowa; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required to vote in Iowa. Valid forms of ID include:
- Iowa driver’s license or non-operator ID
- U.S. passport
- U.S. military ID or veteran’s ID
- Tribal ID/document
- Iowa voter ID card

Voters without above ID may provide Election Day Registration documents, which include the following forms of photo ID:
- Iowa driver’s license or non-driver ID card
- Out-of-state driver's license or non-driver ID card
- U.S. passport
- U.S. military ID
- ID card issued by employer
- Student ID issued by Iowa high school or college
- Tribal ID

If your photo ID doesn't have your current address, you must also show one of the following:
- Residential lease
- Utility bill (including a cell phone bill)
- Bank statement
- Paycheck
- Government check
- Other government document

Any registered voter who does not have a valid driver's license or non-operator's ID issued by the Iowa Department of Transportation will be issued a Voter ID Card for free, automatically, in the mail. This also applies to anyone who registers to vote in the future. Upon receipt of the Voter ID Card, it should be immediately signed.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, another registered voter in the precinct may attest to your identity. You can also register on Election Day without the required ID if another registered voter in the precinct attests to your identity. Voters without the necessary ID or an attester will be offered a provisional ballot and can provide ID up until the time of the county canvass of votes (Monday after election day for Primary and General Elections).

Iowa allows in-person, no excuse absentee voting starting no earlier than 20 days before primary and general elections, and as they are ready for all other elections, though not sooner than 20 days prior to the election.

You can pre-register to vote in Iowa when you turn 17.

Iowa has both caucuses and primaries. Caucuses are run by political parties and are used primarily to select delegates from the local to the national level who then represent voters’ preferences in terms of presidential candidates and party issues. Primaries are run by the state, where voters cast secret ballots in order to elect officials in all races excluding presidential.

Iowa has closed caucuses. Voters must be registered with a party in order to attend that party’s caucus.

Iowa has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. Primaries are run by the state, where voters cast secret ballots in order to elect officials in all races excluding presidential. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Iowa but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place on Election Day.

Kansas

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Kansas; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required to vote in Kansas. If the photo ID has an expiration date on it, the ID must not have expired at the time of voting. An acceptable photo ID does not have to have an expiration date on the document in order to be valid. Persons age 65 or older may use expired photo ID documents. Valid forms of ID include:
- A driver's license or nondriver's identification card issued by Kansas or by another state or district of the United States
- A concealed carry of handgun license issued by Kansas or a concealed carry of handgun or weapon license issued by another state or district of the United States
- A United States passport
- An employee badge or identification document issued by a municipal, county, state, or federal government office
- A military identification document issued by the United States
- A student identification card issued by an accredited postsecondary institution of education in the state of Kansas
- A public assistance identification card issued by a municipal, county, state or federal government office
- An identification card issued by an Indian tribe.

Exemptions exist for individuals whose religious beliefs prohibit photographic identification. Voters with religious objections may sign an affidavit before the election or at the poll on election day to be exempt.

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can get a free nondriver identification card through the Division of Vehicles, Kansas Department of Revenue. In order to obtain a nondriver identification card, a person must present acceptable proof of identity and proof of residence to the Division of Vehicles. If you don’t have proof of identity, you can apply for a free Kansas birth certificate. In order to obtain a fee waiver for a nondriver identification card, you must also sign a form containing an affidavit stating, among other things, that you:
- Are registered to vote in Kansas
- Do not possess a photographic identification document that is valid for voting purposes
- Have provided evidence of current Kansas voting registration status. Examples of such evidence of registration status include a voter registration card (original or photocopy) or a printout from Kansas VoterView.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can vote a provisional ballot. The provisional ballot will be counted only if you submit valid photo ID before the county canvass. Depending on the county, the canvass takes place 7-10 days following election day (on the Monday or on the 2nd Thursday following the election).

Kansas offers early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins up to twenty days before election day. Voters are encouraged to contact their local election office for information on early voting dates and polling locations.

You can pre-register to vote in Kansas if you are 17 years old and will turn 18 by the next election.

Kansas has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. However, unaffiliated voters can register with a political party on Election Day. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Kansas does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline. If you move to Kansas from another state fewer than 45 days before an election and the deadline to register to vote has passed, you may register and vote a president-only ballot at your county election office by 12:00 PM the day before Election Day.

Kentucky

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in Kentucky with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- A resident of Kentucky who is a covered voter as defined in KRS 117A.010
- A student who temporarily resides outside the county of his or her residence
- Incarcerated in jail and charged with a crime, but has not been convicted of the crime
- Changing or has changed his or her place of residence to a different state while the registration books are closed in the new state of residence before an election of electors for President and Vice President of the United States, in which case the voter shall be permitted to cast a mail-in absentee ballot for electors for President and Vice President of the United States only
- Temporarily residing outside the state but still eligible to vote in this state
- Prevented from voting in person at the polls on election day and from casting an in-person absentee ballot on all days in-person absentee voting is conducted because his or her employment location requires him or her to be absent from the county of his or her residence all hours and all days in-person absentee voting is conducted
- A participant in the Secretary of State's crime victim address confidentiality protection program as authorized by KRS 14.312
- Not able to appear at the polls on election day or the days in-person absentee voting is conducted on the account of age, disability, or illness, and who has not been declared mentally disabled by a court of competent jurisdiction.

Photo ID is required to vote in Kentucky. Valid forms of ID include:
- The United States or the Commonwealth of Kentucky;
- The United States Department of Defense, a branch of the uniformed services, the Merchant Marines, or the Kentucky National Guard;
- A public or private college, university, or postgraduate technical or professional school located within the United States;
- Any city government, county government, urban-county government, charter county government, consolidated local government, or unified local government, which is located within this state.
The ID must include the voter’s name and photo.

If you do not have an approved form of ID, a voter’s identity can still be confirmed by personal acquaintance with an election official, but now the election official must sign an affirmation. Additionally, Kentucky provides a free state-issued ID card for individuals who are at least 18 and do not have a valid driver’s license. In addition, voters who cannot obtain a photo ID can sign a “Reasonable Impediment Declaration” (stating reason for inability to obtain photo ID) and present one of the following non-photo IDs:
- Social Security Card;
- Any ID issued by a county in KY that’s been approved by the State Board of Elections and shows voter’s name);
- Any ID card with both the voter’s photograph and name;
- Any food stamp ID card, electronic benefit transfer card, or supplemental nutrition assistance card issued by KY that shows voter’s name; or
- A credit or debit card that shows the voter's name.

Kentucky offers early voting. Early voting begins 21 days before Election Day and ends the day before Election Day.

You can pre-register to vote in Kentucky when you turn 17.

Kentucky has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Kentucky does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Louisiana

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in Louisiana with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- You are a military or overseas voter
- You are 65 years or older
- You are temporarily absent from Louisiana or your parish during the early voting period and on election day, or expect to be
- You work or expect to be offshore working during the early voting period and on election day
- You reside in a nursing home, veterans' home, or a hospital for an extended stay for a physical disability and are unable to vote in person
- You are a student, instructor, or professor located and living outside of your parish of registration or the spouse/dependent of
- You are minister, priest, rabbi, or other member of the clergy assigned outside of your parish of registration, or a spouse/dependent
- You moved more than 100 miles from the parish seat of your former residence after the voter registration books closed (30 days prior to an election)
- You are involuntarily confined in an institution for mental treatment outside your parish of registration and you are not interdicted and not judicially declared incompetent
- You expect to be hospitalized on election day and did not have knowledge of the hospitalization until after the time for early voting had expired; or you were hospitalized during the time for early voting and you expect to be hospitalized on election day; or you were either hospitalized or restricted to bed by your physician during early voting and on election day
- You are incarcerated or expect to be incarcerated in an institution inside or outside of your parish of registration and you are not under an order of imprisonment for conviction of a felony
- You are a program participant in the secretary of state's Address Confidentiality Program
- You will be sequestered with jury duty on the day of the election
- You have already been approved by the registrar of voters for the Disability Program
- You are submitting proof of disability with your application to the registrar of voters for the Disability Program
- You are homebound, voting for the first time, and submitting prroof of disability with your application to the registrar of voters for the Disability Program.

Photo ID is required to vote in Louisiana. Valid forms of ID include:
- Louisiana driver's license
- a Louisiana special identification card
- LA Wallet digital driver's license
- a United States military identification card that contains the applicant's name and picture
- other generally recognized picture identification card that contains the name and signature of the applicant

If you do not have an approved form of ID, all registered voters may obtain a free Louisiana special identification card by presenting a voter information card to the Office of Motor Vehicles. If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you may still cast your vote by signature on a voter affidavit.

Louisiana offers early voting. Early voting begins 14 to 7 days prior to election day, or 15 days prior to an election if any state or federal holiday falls within an early voting period.

You can pre-register to vote in Louisiana in person when you turn 16, or by any method when you turn 17.

Louisiana has closed presidential primaries and all other primaries are open. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's presidential primary. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections other than presidential primaries, regardless of political party. 17-year-olds cannot vote in any primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Louisiana does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Maine

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Maine; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in Maine, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters.

Maine offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 30 days before an election.

You can pre-register to vote in Maine when you turn 16.

Maine has closed primaries. In presidential, state, and congressional primaries, voters must affiliate with a party to vote in their primary, but unaffiliated voters may affiliate with a party on election day. Affiliated voters wishing to update their affiliation must do so at least 15 days before an election. You can update your affiliation 3 months after the date of your last party change. 17-year-olds can in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Maine but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your town office or city hall any day, including during the early voting period and on Election Day.

Maryland

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Maryland; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in Maryland, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters.

Voters do not need an excuse to vote early/in-person absentee

You can pre-register to vote in Maryland when you turn 16.

Maryland typically has closed primaries, although it is up to the state political parties to decide. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Maryland but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place or early voting center on Election Day or during the early voting period.

Massachusetts

COVID-19 UPDATE: Voting by mail will be allowed in all local and state elections through December 15, 2021. You do not need to have an excuse to cast an early ballot by mail.

Voters can typically only vote absentee/by mail in Massachusetts with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- Be away from your city/town on Election Day, including by being a military voter on active duty, residing outside of the United States, having been admitted to the hospital within 1 week of the election, having been quarantined within 1 week of the election, or being incarcerated.
- Have a disability that keeps you from voting at your polling place; or
- Have a religious belief that prevents you from voting at your polling place on Election Day

Photo ID is usually not required to vote in Massachusetts. However, you may be asked to show identification when you check-in at your polling place for any of the following reasons:

- You are voting for the first time in Massachusetts in a federal election;
- You are an inactive voter;
- You are casting a provisional or challenged ballot;
- The poll worker has a reasonable suspicion that leads them to request identification.

Valid forms of ID include:
- driver's license;
- state-issued ID card;
- recent utility bill;
- rent receipt;
- lease;
- copy of a voter registration affidavit;
- any other printed identification which contains the voter's name and address.

If you are voting for the first time in a federal election in Massachusetts after registering to vote by mail, you may be required to show identification under federal law. It is recommended that you include a copy of your identification with your mail-in voter registration form; if you choose not to do so, you may be asked for identification when you go to your polling place on Election Day. If you are unable to present identification when you check-in, you may cast a provisional ballot and return later with identification. If you do not return with acceptable identification by close of polls, your ballot cannot be counted.

You may also be asked to show identification if you are on the list of inactive voters or if a poll worker has reasonable cause to request it. If you are not able to present identification in such a situation, you must still be permitted to vote; however, your ballot must be challenged. This means that your name and address, the name and address of the challenger, and the reason for the challenge must be written on your ballot. You ballot will be cast normally, and will only be re-examined in the case of a recount, court order, or audit.

Massachsetts offers early voting. Voters do not need an excuse to vote early. Early voting begins the eleventh business day before an election and ends one business day before election day.

You can pre-register to vote in Massachusetts when you turn 16.

Massachusetts has open primaries. Registered unaffiliated voters may choose one party's primary ballot to vote on and will remain unaffiliated for future elections. Voters enrolled with a party must vote in their party’s primary. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Massachusetts does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Michigan

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Michigan; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required to vote in Michigan. Valid forms of ID include:
- Michigan driver's license
- Michigan personal identification card
- Driver's license or personal identification card issued by another state
- Federal or state government-issued photo ID
- U.S. passport
- Military ID with photo
- Student ID with photo—from a high school or accredited institution of higher education
- Tribal ID with photo

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can get a state identification card at your local Secretary of State branch office for $10. State ID cards are free to individuals who are 65 or older or who are blind. Cards are also free to those who have had driving privileges terminated due to a physical or mental disability. The fee can also be waived for individuals who present other good cause for a fee waiver.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can cast a ballot by signing an affidavit, and your ballot will be counted with all other ballots on Election Day.

Michigan offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 40 days before an election.

You can pre-register to vote in Michigan if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Michigan has open non-presidential primaries. For presidential primaries, a voter must declare a political party when requesting a ballot – however, this is not considered a declaration of party affiliation and has no bearing on how a voter may vote in future primary elections. For all other primaries, voters will be issued a single ballot with all political parties and candidates listed, and voters may choose which party primary they would like to participate in. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Michigan but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your city or township clerk’s office during the early voting period or on Election Day. Individuals who register to vote within the 14-day period immediately preceding an election must appear in person at their city or township clerk’s office and provide proof of residency.

Minnesota

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Minnesota; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in Minnesota, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters.

If you need to register or update your registration, or you have not voted in four years or more, you will need to show proof of residence before you vote in Minnesota. Valid forms of proof of residence include:
- ID with current name and address, including: valid Minnesota driver’s license, learner’s permit or ID, or a receipt for any of these; Tribal ID with name, address, photo and signature
- Photo ID and a document with current name and address (see lists below)
- Registered voter who can confirm your address
- College student ID with housing list
- Valid registration in the same precinct
- Notice of Late Registration
- Staff person of a residential facility
- A registered voter from your precinct can go with you to the polling place to sign an oath confirming your address. This is known as 'vouching.' A registered voter can vouch for up to eight voters. You cannot vouch for others if someone vouched for you.
- If you registered to vote within 20 days of the election, you may get a Notice of Late Registration in the mail. Bring it with you and use it as your proof of residence to register.
- If you live in a residential facility, a staff person can go with you to the polling place to confirm your address. This is known as 'vouching.' A staff person can vouch for all eligible voters living in the facility.

If you’re using a combination of a photo ID and a document with your current name and address, the following are acceptable photo IDs (the ID can be expired):
- Driver's license, state ID or learner’s permit issued by any state
- U.S. Passport
- U.S. Military or Veteran ID
- Tribal ID with name, signature and photo
- Minnesota university, college or technical college ID
- Minnesota high school ID

If you’re using a combination of a photo ID and a document with your current name and address, the following are approved documents with your current name and address (these can be shown on electronic device):

- Bill, account or start-of-service statement due or dated within 30 days of the election for:
- Phone, TV or internet
- Solid waste, sewer, electric, gas or water
- Banking or credit card
- Rent or mortgage
- Residential lease or rent agreement valid through Election Day
- Current student fee statement


Minnesota offers early voting. Voters do not need an excuse to vote early in Minnesota. For most elections, absentee voting locations must be open during their normal business hours starting 46 days before the election.

You can pre-register to vote in Minnesota if you will turn 18 by the next election. Because special elections can be called at unexpected times, your application may be returned if an election becomes scheduled in between the date you register and your birthday. If that happens, simply wait until that election passes, and register again.

Minnesota has open congressional and state primaries. You can only vote for candidates from one political party. If you vote for candidates from more than one political party, your votes will not count. You decide when you vote which one of the parties you will vote for—Minnesota does not have political party registration.

Minnesota also has open presidential primaries. Voters must request the ballot of the party of their choice. If a voter refuses to select a party, they will not be able to vote in the presidential nomination primary.

17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Minnesota but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place on Election Day or at the county election office during early voting.

Mississippi

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in Mississippi with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- Enlisted or commissioned members of the United States Armed Forces, their spouses and/or dependents, who will be absent from their county of residence on Election Day
- Members of the Merchant Marines or the American Red Cross, or their spouses and/or dependents, who will be absent from their county of residence on Election Day
- Disabled war veterans who are patients in any hospital, or their spouses and/or dependents, who will be absent from their county of residence on Election Day
- Civilians attached to any branch of the Armed Forces, the Merchant Marines, or the American Red Cross and serving outside the United States, or their spouses and/or dependents, who will be absent from their county of residence on Election Day
- Trained or certified emergency response providers who is deployed on Election Day during any state of emergency declared by the President of the United States or any Governor of any U.S. State, who will be absent from their county of residence on Election Day
- Persons temporarily residing outside the territorial limits of the United States and the District of Columbia
- Students, teachers, or administrators whose employment or studies necessitate their absence from their county of voting residence, or their dependent or spouse who maintains a common domicile outside the county of voting residence
- Persons who will be outside their county of residence on Election Day
- Persons required to be at work on Election Day during the times at which the polls will be open
- Persons temporarily or permanently physically disabled
- Persons sixty-five (65) years of age or older
- Parents, spouses, or dependents of persons having a temporary or permanent physical disability, who are hospitalized outside their county of residence or more than fifty (50) miles away from their residence if the parents, spouses, and/or dependents will be with such persons on election day
- Members of the Mississippi Congressional delegation, or their spouses and/or dependents, who will be absent from their county of residence on Election Day.

Photo ID is required to vote in Mississippi. Valid forms of ID include:
- A driver's license
- A photo ID card issued by a branch, department, or entity of the State of Mississippi
- A United States passport
- A government employee ID card
- A firearms license
- A student photo ID issued by an accredited Mississippi university, college, or community/junior college
- A United States military ID
- A tribal photo ID
- Any other photo ID issued by any branch, department, agency or entity of the United States government or any State government
- A Mississippi Voter Identification Card

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can get a free Mississippi Voter Identification Card at any circuit clerk’s office. Call 1 (844) MSVoter (1 (844) 678-6837) for Voter ID information or assistance in obtaining a Mississippi Voter Identification Card.

On Election Day if you do not present an acceptable form of photo ID or are unable to do so because of a religious objection, you are entitled to cast an affidavit ballot. A voter casting an affidavit ballot because he/she did not present an acceptable form of photo ID based upon a religious objection may not have his/her ballot rejected for this reason if he/she completes an Affidavit of Religious Objection in the Circuit or Municipal Clerk’s Office within five business days after Election Day. A voter casting an affidavit ballot because he/she did not present an acceptable form of photo ID may not have his/her ballot rejected for this reason if he/she presents an acceptable form of photo ID in the Circuit or Municipal Clerk’s Office within five business days after Election Day.

Mississippi is a bottom-up state, so elections are run by county election officials. Please contact your county circuit clerk to see if you can vote early.

You can pre-register to vote in Mississippi if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Mississippi has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Mississippi does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Missouri

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in Missouri with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- Absence on Election Day from the jurisdiction of the election authority in which such voter is registered to vote;
- Incapacity or confinement due to illness or physical disability, including a person who is primarily responsible for the physical care of a person who is incapacitated or confined due to illness or disability;
- Religious belief or practice;
- Employment as an election authority, as a member of an election authority, or by an election authority at a location other than such voter's polling place;
- Incarceration, provided all qualifications for voting are retained.
- Certified participation in the address confidentiality program established under sections 589.660 to 589.681 because of safety concerns.

Voters requesting an absentee ballot by mail who have registered by mail and have not voted in person are required to submit a copy of their personal identification unless they provided a copy with their registration application. Examples of acceptable identification are:
- Identification issued by the state of Missouri, an agency of the state, or a local election authority of the state;
- Identification issued by the United States government or agency thereof;
- Identification issued by an institution of higher education, including a university, college, vocational and technical school, located within the state of Missouri;
- A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck or other government document that contains the name and address of the voter; or
- Other identification approved by the secretary of state under rules promulgated pursuant to Missouri law.

Absentee ballots must be notarized (see exceptions below) and can be returned by mail or in person.

The identification requirement, as well as the notary requirement for absentee ballots, does not apply to overseas voters, those on active military duty or members of their immediate family living with them or voters who are permanently disabled and their caregivers.

Photo ID is required to vote in Missouri. Valid forms of ID include:
- Identification issued by the state of Missouri, an agency of the state, or a local election authority of the state;
- Identification issued by the United States government or agency thereof;
- Identification issued by an institution of higher education, including a university, college, vocational and technical school, located within the state of Missouri; or
- A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check or other government document that contains the name and address of the voter.

If you do not possess any of these forms of identification, but are a registered voter, you may cast a provisional ballot. Your provisional ballot will count if: (1) you return to your polling place on Election Day with a photo ID; or (2) the signature on your provisional ballot envelope is determined by your local election authority to match the signature on your voter registration record.

Even though you do not need a Photo ID to vote, you might be eligible for a free Missouri nondriver license for voting purposes. You can send a form to the Secretary of State’s office and they will assist you in obtaining one.

Missouri offers in-person absentee voting. The deadline for absentee voting in person in the office of the election authority is 5pm on the day before the election. Voters can only vote early with an approved excuse:
- Absence on Election Day from the jurisdiction of the election authority in which such voter is registered to vote;
- Incapacity or confinement due to illness or physical disability, including a person who is primarily responsible for the physical care of a person who is incapacitated or confined due to illness or disability;
- Religious belief or practice;
- Employment as an election authority, as a member of an election authority, or by an election authority at a location other than such voter's polling place;
- Incarceration, provided all qualifications for voting are retained.
- Certified participation in the address confidentiality program established under sections 589.660 to 589.681 because of safety concerns.

If you registered by mail and this is your first time voting, you must provide a copy of either: (1) an ID issued by the Federal Government, state of Missouri, or a local election authority; (2) ID issued by a Missouri institution (public or private) of higher education; or (3) a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, government check or other government document that contains your name and address.

You can pre-register to vote in Missouri when you turn 17 ½.

Missouri has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Missouri does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Montana

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Montana; no excuse is needed.

ID is required to vote in Montana. Valid forms of ID include:
- A current photo ID showing the elector’s name
- A current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, voter confirmation notice, tribal ID, government check or other government document that shows your name and current address.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can still vote by requesting and filling out a “Polling Place Elector ID” form. Or, you can vote a provisional ballot. Your provisional ballot will be counted if you provide valid ID to the county election office by 5:00 p.m. the day after the election, or mail it to the county election office postmarked by the day after the election.

Montana offers in-person absentee voting. No excuse is needed to vote absentee in person. In-person absentee voting begins 30 days prior to the election and ends at noon the day before Election Day.

You can pre-register to vote in Montana if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Montana has open primaries. There is no party registration in Montana. Individuals who vote in a primary election are given all the parties’ ballots, and can choose in private which party ballot they wish to vote. Voters in a primary election cannot vote more than one party’s ballots. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Montana but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your county election office or designated location any time until noon the day before the election. Montana does not offer same-day registration on Election Day.

Nebraska

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Nebraska; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in Nebraska, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters.

Nebraska offers early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 35 days prior to a primary or general election and 15 days for all other elections and ends the day before an election.

You can pre-register to vote in Nebraska if you will turn 18 years old on or before the first Tuesday after the first Monday in November.

Nebraska has closed primaries by default, but political parties may choose to open them. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Nebraska does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline. The only exception is at a presidential election if you have recently moved to Nebraska, or if you moved from Nebraska to another state after that state’s registration deadline. You can vote a presidential-only ballot by contacting your county election official.

Nevada

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Nevada; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required to vote in Nevada. Valid forms of ID include a current and valid form of the following:
- Nevada Driver’s license
- Nevada Identification Card
- Armed Forces Identification Card
- Sheriff’s Work Identification Card
- Identification Card issued by an Agency of the State of Nevada or other political subdivision
- Student Identification Card
- United States Passport
- Tribal Identification Card
- Other forms of identification may be used; please check with your County Clerk/Registrar of Voters for other acceptable forms of identification

If you’re a first-time voter, didn’t include a copy of ID when you registered, and didn’t provide a valid driver’s license number or social security number on your application, or if your identification does not include your address, be sure to bring one of the following:
- A current photo ID that shows your address
- A copy of a current utility bill, bank statement, paycheck, or other government document that shows your name and address (however, a voter registration ID is not accepted)

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can apply for a Nevada ID card.

Nevada offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early.

You can pre-register to vote in Nevada when you turn 17.

Nevada has closed caucuses and primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only participate in that party's caucus. 17-year-olds can participate in presidential caucuses if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election, but cannot do so for other caucuses or primaries.

If you’re eligible to vote in Nevada but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place during the early voting period or on Election Day.

New Hampshire

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in New Hampshire with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include: being absent from the voter’s city or town, a religious observance, disability or illness, and employment commitments (including caregiving) during the entire time the polls are open.

Photo ID is required to vote in New Hampshire. Valid forms of ID include:
- Driver’s license issued by any state or federal government
- Non-driver ID card issued by NH DMV or motor vehicle agency of another state
- Photo ID card for “voting identification only” issued by NH DMV (RSA 260:21)
- United States armed services identification card
- United States passport or passcard
- NH student ID card (see more information below about acceptable student ID)
- A photo ID not mentioned above, but determined to be legitimate by the moderator, supervisors of the checklist, or clerk of a town, ward or city. If any person authorized to challenge a voter does so under this provision, the voter shall be required to fill out a challenged voter affidavit before obtaining a ballot.
- Verification of the voter’s identity by a moderator or supervisor of the checklist or clerk of a town, ward or city (not a ballot clerk). If any person authorized to challenge a voter does so under this provision, the voter shall be required to fill out a challenged voter affidavit before obtaining a ballot.


An acceptable photo ID must have an expiration date or date of issuance. The ID will remain valid 5 years beyond the expiration date unless the voter is 65 or older in which case an acceptable photo ID may be used without regard to expiration date. The name on the ID shall substantially conform to the name on the checklist.

Acceptable student photo ID cards must be issued by:
- A college, university, or career school approved or licensed to operate in New Hampshire
- A public high school in New Hampshire
- A non-public high school in New Hampshire accredited by a private school accrediting agency that is recognized by the NH Department of Education
- Dartmouth College
- A college or university operated by the university system of New Hampshire or the community college system of New Hampshire

All student ID cards must have an issuance or expiration date that has not been exceeded by more than 5 years. Each August the Commissioner of the Department of Education will provide to the Secretary of State a list of all approved, licensed, and accredited schools from which a student ID is acceptable.

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you may obtain a free photo ID for voting purposes only by presenting a voucher from your town/city clerk or the Secretary of State to any NH DMV office that issues identification. 

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you will be permitted to vote after signing a challenged voter affidavit. You will also have your photograph taken by an election official, and they will attach this photo to the signed affidavit. If you object to the photograph requirement for religious reasons, you can instead sign an additional affidavit of religious exemption. If you filled out a challenged voter affidavit in order to vote on Election Day, you will receive a verification letter from the Secretary of State requesting confirmation that you voted in the election. If you do not respond in writing to the Secretary of State within 30 days of the date it was mailed, the Attorney General will conduct an investigation to determine whether fraudulent voting occurred.

New Hampshire does not offer early voting.

You can pre-register to vote in New Hampshire if you will turn 18 by the next election.

New Hampshire has semi-open primaries. Undeclared voters can choose to vote in either primary. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in New Hampshire but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place on Election Day.

New Jersey

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in New Jersey; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in New Jersey, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters.

New Jersey offers in person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 4 days prior to non-presidential primary elections, 6 days prior to presidential primary elections, and 10 days prior to general elections, and ends 2 days before the election.

You can pre-register to vote in New Jersey when you turn 17.

New Jersey has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. For congressional and state primary elections, voters can choose to affiliate with a party at the polls on Election Day if the voter is unaffiliated. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

New Jersey does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

New Mexico

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in New Mexico; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in most New Mexico elections, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters, but some municipal elections require ID, including the City of Albuquerque and the City of Rio Rancho.

New Mexico offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins the 28th day before the election and ends the Saturday before the election. Expanded early voting is available in many counties beginning on the third Saturday before the election.

You can pre-register to vote in New Mexico if you will turn 18 by the next election.

New Mexico has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in New Mexico but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your county clerk’s office during the early voting period (until the Saturday before the election). New Mexico does not offer same-day registration on Election Day.

New York

COVID-19 UPDATE: All voters may use the excuse "temporary or permanent illness or disability" to request an absentee ballot.

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in New York with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- Absent from your county or, if a resident of New York City absent from the five boroughs, on Election Day.
- Unable to appear at the polls due to temporary or permanent illness or disability (temporary illness includes being unable to appear due to risk of contracting or spreading a communicable disease like COVID-19).
- Unable to appear because you are the primary care giver of one or more individuals who are ill or physically disabled.
- A resident or patient of a Veterans Health Administration Hospital.
- Detained in jail awaiting Grand Jury action or confined in prison after conviction for an offense other than a felony.

Photo ID is not required to vote in New York, uness ID was not shown with voter registration. Valid forms of ID include:
- Driver's license number
- Non-driver's ID number
- Last four digits of Social Security number

New York offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins on the tenth day prior to an election and ends on the second day prior to the election.

You can pre-register to vote in New York when you turn 16.

New York has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Voters may change their enrollment in a political party up to twenty five days before the general election, which will be effective immediately. Any change of enrollment after February 16 and seven days before the June primary will be effective on the seventh day following the June primary.

New York does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

North Carolina

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in North Carolina; no excuse is needed.

North Carolina’s voter ID law is currently involved in ongoing litigation and a photo ID is not required to vote due to two preliminary injunctions granted by the United States District Court for the Middle District of North Carolina and the North Carolina Court of Appeals. The injunctions will remain in effect until so ordered by the courts.

North Carolina offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins on the third Thursday prior to an election and ends at 3pm on the last Sunday prior to the election.

You can pre-register to vote in North Carolina when you turn 16.

North Carolina has semi-closed primaries. Unless a recognized party chooses to have its primary open to unaffiliated voters, only voters registered with a particular party may vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in North Carolina but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place during the early voting period. North Carolina does not offer same-day registration on Election Day.

North Dakota

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in North Dakota; no excuse is needed.

ID is required to vote in North Dakota. ID must include the voter’s name, current North Dakota residential address, and date of birth. Valid forms of ID include:
- Driver’s license
- Nondriver’s identification card
- Tribal government issued identification (including those issued by BIA for a tribe located in North Dakota, any other tribal agency or entity, or any other document that sets forth the tribal member’s name, date of birth, and current North Dakota residential address)
- Long term care identification certificate (provided by North Dakota facility)

If an individual’s valid form of identification does not include the North Dakota residential address or date of birth, or the North Dakota residential address is not current, the individual may supplement the identification with a current utility bill; a current bank statement; a check or a document issued by a federal, state, local, or tribal government (including those issued by BIA for a tribe located in North Dakota, any other tribal agency or entity, or any other document that sets forth the tribal member’s name, date of birth, and current North Dakota residential address); or a paycheck.

If an individual is not able to show a valid form of identification but asserts qualifications as an elector, the individual may mark a ballot that will be securely set aside. When the individual provides valid identification to the proper election official prior to the meeting of the canvassing board, the set aside ballot will be presented to the canvassing board for proper inclusion in the tally.

North Dakota offers in-person early voting. Voters do not need an excuse to vote early. Early voting is typically available for the fifteen days immediately before an election, though exact dates vary by county.

North Dakota has no pre-registration or voter registration.

North Dakota has open primaries. Voters are able to choose any political party’s primary to vote in. However, voters are not allowed to cross party lines on the primary ballot and may only vote for candidates from one political party. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election, except for Democratic presidential caucuses.

North Dakota has no voter registration. You simply need to bring valid proof of identification and residency to the polls on Election Day in order to vote.

Ohio

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Ohio; no excuse is needed.

ID is required to vote in Ohio. Valid forms of ID include:
- An unexpired Ohio driver’s license or state identification card with present or former address so long as the voter’s present residential address is printed in the official list of registered voters for that precinct
- A military identification
- A photo identification that was issued by the United States government or the State of Ohio, that contains the voter’s name and current address and that has an expiration date that has not passed
- An original or copy of a current utility bill (including cell phone bill) with the voter’s name and present address
- An original or copy of a current bank statement with the voter’s name and present address
- An original or copy of a current government check with the voter’s name and present address
- An original or copy of a current paycheck with the voter’s name and present address
- An original or copy of a current other government document (other than a notice of voter registration mailed by a board of elections) that shows the voter’s name and present address.

For utility bills, bank statements, government checks, paychecks, and other government documents, “current” is defined as within the last 12 months. “Other government document” includes license renewal and other notices, fishing and marine equipment operator’s license, court papers, or grade reports or transcripts. “Government office” includes any local (including county, city, township, school district and village), state or federal (United States) government office, branch, agency, commission, public college or university or public community college, whether or not in Ohio.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you may provide either your Ohio driver’s license or state identification number (which begins with two letters followed by six numbers) or the last four digits of your Social Security number and cast a provisional ballot. Once the information is reviewed and verified by the board of elections, your ballot will be counted.

If you do not provide the documents or information listed above, you can still vote a provisional ballot. However, in order for that ballot to be counted, you must return to the board of elections no later than seven days following Election Day to provide a qualifying form of identification.

Voters do not need an excuse to vote early/in-person absentee

You can pre-register to vote in Ohio if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Ohio has semi-open primaries. Voters become affiliated with a political party by choosing to vote in that party’s primary. Voters declare or change their affiliation by choosing a party’s primary ballot. Unaffiliated voters can vote with an Official Questions and Issues Ballot if they do not wish to vote on people or become affiliated with a party. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election. However, they can only vote to nominate candidates and cannot vote on issues or party central committees until they are 18.

Ohio does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Oklahoma

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Oklahoma; no excuse is needed.

ID is required to vote in Oklahoma. Valid forms of ID include:
- Oklahoma driver license
- Oklahoma Identification Card
- United States passport
- United States military identification
- Voter Identification Card issued by the County Election Board

A document used for proof of identity for voting must have been issued by the United States government, the State of Oklahoma, or a federally recognized tribal government. Valid forms of ID must contain the following information:
- The name of the person to whom it was issued
- A photograph of the person to whom it was issued (with the exception of the voter identification card, which does not have a photograph)
- An expiration date that is after the date of the election, unless the identification is valid indefinitely
- The law requires the voter's name on the proof of identity document to "substantially conform" to the voter's name in the Precinct Registry. In other words, your name on your proof of identity must match your name in the Precinct Registry.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you may vote by provisional ballot and sign a sworn affidavit. Provisional ballots are sealed inside special envelopes and are not put through the voting device. After election day, County Election Board officials will investigate the information provided by the voter on the affidavit and either will approve the provisional ballot for counting or will reject it based on the outcome of that investigation. A provisional ballot cast by a voter who declines or is unable to produce proof of identity shall only be considered verified and approved for counting if:
- The voter's name on the affidavit substantially conforms to the voter's name in the voter registration database.
- The voter's residence address on the affidavit substantially conforms to the voter's residence address in the voter registration database.
- The voter's date of birth matches the information in the voter registration database.
- The voter's Oklahoma driver license number or the last four digits of the voter's Social Security number on the affidavit matches the information in the voter registration database. (This provision does not apply if the voter was not required to provide a driver's license number or the last four digits of the voter's Social Security number at the time of registration.)
- The provisional ballot meets the eligibility requirements set forth in Section 7-116.1 of Title 26 of the Oklahoma Statues.

Voters do not need an excuse to vote early/in-person absentee

You can pre-register to vote in Oklahoma when you turn 17½. Applicants who pre-register cannot vote until they turn 18 years old and the application has been approved by the applicant's County Election Board. Applicants will be mailed a voter ID card upon approval of their registration. Applications received less than 25 days before an election, in which the applicant has turned 18 and is eligible to vote, will be held and processed immediately following the election.

Oklahoma has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. However, parties can choose to allow registered Independent voters to also participate in their primaries. Nonpartisan judicial offices, state questions and county questions often are included in primary elections. All registered voters, including Independents, are entitled to receive those ballots. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Oklahoma does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Oregon

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Oregon; no excuse is needed. All registered voters in Oregon should automatically receive absentee/vote-by-mail ballots at the address where they are registered.

ID is not required to vote in Oregon, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters.

Oregon does not offer in-person early voting. Vote-by-mail ballots are automatically sent to all registered voters and can be mailed or dropped off at any official ballot drop box location across the state before 8 p.m. on election day.

You can pre-register to vote in Oregon when you turn 16.

Oregon has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. At the primary election, voters who are not registered in one of the major political parties would receive a ballot containing nonpartisan contests, such as judicial elections, which all registered voters may vote on. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Oregon does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Pennsylvania

Pennsylvania has two types of mail voting. All voters are eligible to vote by mail in Pennsylvania; no excuse is needed. Voters can only vote absentee in Pennsylvania with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include being absent from your municipality or having a physical illness or disability.

ID is required to vote in Pennsylvania only for voters who are voting in a given election district for the first time. Valid forms of ID include:
- Pennsylvania driver’s license or PennDOT ID card
- ID issued by any Commonwealth agency
- ID issued by the U.S. Government
- U.S. passport
- U.S. Armed Forces ID
- Student ID
- Employee ID

If you do not have a photo ID, you can use a non-photo identification that includes your name and address:
- Confirmation issued by the County Voter Registration Office
- Non-photo ID issued by the Commonwealth
- Non-photo ID issued by the U.S. Government
- Firearm permit
- Current utility bill
- Current bank statement
- Current paycheck
- Government check

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can vote a provisional ballot. Within seven days after the election, the County Election Office will decide whether you were eligible to vote at the election district where you voted. If they determine you were eligible, they will count your provisional ballot.

Pennsylvania offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. As soon as ballots are ready, you can request, receive, mark and cast your mail-in or absentee ballot all in one visit to your county election office or other designated location.

You can pre-register to vote in Pennsylvania if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Pennsylvania has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Pennsylvania does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Rhode Island

Voters must provide an excuse to vote absentee/by mail in Rhode Island, but any excuse may be given.

Photo ID is required to vote in Rhode Island. Valid forms of ID include:
- RI Driver's License or Permit
- RI Voter ID Card
- U.S. Passport
- ID issued by a U.S. educational institution
- U.S. military ID
- ID card issued by the United States or the State of Rhode Island
- Government issued medical card
- Tribal ID

If you do not have an approved form of ID, the Rhode Island Secretary of State's office will issue you a free voter photo ID card. See the Secretary of State's website for additional information on the program and the documents required to obtain a voter photo ID card, or call (401) 222-2340.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can vote a provisional ballot. You will have until the close of business the day after the election to provide information to the Board of Canvassers to help qualify the ballot.

Rhode Island offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early.

You can pre-register to vote in Rhode Island when you turn 16.

Rhode Island has semi-open primaries. If you are affiliated with a specific political party, you may only vote in that party’s primary. Unaffiliated (also known as independent) voters can vote in any party primary but, by casting a vote in a party primary, you automatically become affiliated with that party. To return to an unaffiliated status, you may request a “disaffiliation form” from poll workers and fill it out before leaving the polling place. You will officially return to your unaffiliated status in 90 days. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Rhode Island but have not yet registered, you can register and vote for President/Vice-President only at your city or town hall on Election Day. Be sure to register by the deadline to vote in all other elections.

South Carolina

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in South Carolina with an approved excuse. The provision expanding absentee voting under the excuse of "Statewide Emergency" has expired. Approved excuses include:
- Members of the Armed Forces
- Members of the Merchant Marine
- Spouses and dependents residing with members of the Armed Forces or Merchant Marine
- Persons serving with the American Red Cross or with the United Service -Organizations (USO) who are attached to and serving with the Armed Forces outside their county of residence and their spouses and dependents residing with them
- Citizens residing overseas
- Persons who are physically disabled (includes illnesses and injuries)
- Students attending school outside their county of residence and their spouses and dependents residing with them
- Persons who for reasons of employment will not be able to vote on election day
- Government employees serving outside their county of residence on Election -Day and their spouses and dependents residing with them
- Persons who plan to be on vacation outside their county of residence on Election Day
- Persons serving as a juror in state or federal court on Election Day
- Persons admitted to the hospital as emergency patients on Election Day or within a four-day period before the election
- Persons with a death or funeral in the family within three days before the election
- Persons confined to a jail or pre-trial facility pending disposition of arrest or trial
- Persons attending sick or physically disabled persons
- Certified poll watchers, poll managers, and county election officials working on Election Day
- Persons sixty-five years of age or older
- Persons who for religious reasons do not want to vote on a Saturday (Presidential Primaries Only)

Photo ID is required to vote in South Carolina. Valid forms of ID include:
- SC Driver's License
- SC Department of Motor Vehicles ID Card (includes SC Concealed Weapons Permit)
- SC Voter Registration Card with Photo
- Federal Military ID (includes all Department of Defense Photo IDs and Veterans Affairs Benefits Card)
- US Passport (includes US Passport ID Card)

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can get a free Photo ID from your county voter registration and elections office or your local DMV office. If you're already registered to vote, you can go to your county voter registration and elections office, provide your date of birth and the last four digits of your Social Security Number, and have your photo taken.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you may vote a provisional ballot that will count only if you show your Photo ID to the election commission prior to certification of the election (usually Thursday or Friday after the election).

If you can’t get a photo ID, you can bring your voter registration card to polls, vote a provisional ballot, and sign an affidavit stating you have a reasonable impediment to obtaining Photo ID. A reasonable impediment is any valid reason, beyond your control, which created an obstacle to obtaining a photo ID. This ballot will count unless someone proves to the election commission that you are lying about your identity or about having the listed impediment.

South Carolina offers in-person early voting. You may vote absentee in person up until 5pm on the day before election day. Voters can only vote early with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- Members of the Armed Forces
- Members of the Merchant Marine
- Spouses and dependents residing with members of the Armed Forces or Merchant Marine
- Persons serving with the American Red Cross or with the United Service Organizations (USO) who are attached to and serving with the Armed Forces outside their county of residence and their spouses and dependents residing with them
- Citizens residing overseas
- Persons who are physically disabled (includes illnesses and injuries)
- Students attending school outside their county of residence and their spouses and dependents residing with them
- Persons who for reasons of employment will not be able to vote on election day
- Government employees serving outside their county of residence on Election Day and their spouses and dependents residing with them
- Persons who plan to be on vacation outside their county of residence on Election Day
- Persons serving as a juror in state or federal court on Election Day
- Persons admitted to the hospital as emergency patients on Election Day or within a four-day period before the election
- Persons with a death or funeral in the family within three days before the election
- Persons confined to a jail or pre-trial facility pending disposition of arrest or trial
- Persons attending sick or physically disabled persons
- Certified poll watchers, poll managers, and county election officials working on Election Day
- Persons sixty-five years of age or older
- Persons who for religious reasons do not want to vote on a Saturday (Presidential Primaries Only)

You can pre-register to vote in South Carolina if you will turn 18 by the next election.

South Carolina has open primaries, but you are only allowed to participate in one party’s primary (this affiliation lasts only for primaries, except in the case of a runoff where you must vote the same as you voted in the primary). 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

South Carolina does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

South Dakota

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in South Dakota; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required to vote in South Dakota, allow you can still vote a regular ballot if you don’t have ID. Valid forms of ID include:
- South Dakota driver's license or nondriver ID card
- U.S. government photo ID (passport is acceptable)
- U.S. Armed Forces ID
- Current student photo identification card from a South Dakota high school or South Dakota accredited institution of higher education
- Tribal photo ID

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can sign a personal identification affidavit and vote a regular ballot.

South Dakota offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early.

You can pre-register to vote in South Dakota if you will turn 18 by the next election.

South Dakota has semi-open and closed primaries. Only voters registered with the Republican Party may only vote in that party's primary. Voters registered with the Democratic Party and unaffiliated voters may vote in the Democratic Primary. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

South Dakota does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Tennessee

Voters can typically only vote absentee/by mail in Tennessee with an approved excuse. During COVID-19, illness, physical disability, or other underlying health condition that makes one especially vulnerable to COVID-19 is considered an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- You are sixty (60) years of age or older.
- You will be outside the county where you are registered during the early voting period and all day on Election Day.
- You are hospitalized, ill or physically disabled and unable to appear at your polling place to vote (this includes persons who have underlying medical or health conditions which in their determination render them more susceptible to contracting COVID-19 or at greater risk should they contract it). A physician’s statement is not required.
- You are the caretaker of a person who is hospitalized, ill, or disabled (this includes voters who care for or reside with persons who have underlying medical or health conditions which in their determination render them more susceptible to contracting COVID-19 or at greater risk should they contract it). A physician’s statement is not required.
- You or your spouse are a full-time student in an accredited college or university outside the county where you are registered.
- You reside in a nursing home, assisted living facility or home for the aged outside your county of residence.
- You are a candidate for office in the election.
- You are observing a religious holiday that prevents you from voting in person during the early voting period and on Election Day.
- You serve as an Election Day official or as a member or employee of the election commission.
- You will be unable to vote in-person due to jury duty.
- You have a physical disability and an inaccessible polling place.
- You or your spouse possess a valid commercial drivers license (CDL) or Transportation Worker Identification Credential (TWIC) card and you will be working outside the state or county of registration during the open hours of early voting and Election Day and have no specific out-of-county or out-of-state address to which mail may be sent or received during such time.
- You are a member of the military or are an overseas citizen.
- You are on the permanent absentee list.

Photo ID is required to vote in Tennessee. ID may be expired, and valid forms of ID include:
- Tennessee driver license with your photo
- United States Passport
- Photo ID issued by the Tennessee Department of Safety and Homeland Security
- Photo ID issued by the federal or Tennessee state government
- United States Military photo ID
- Tennessee handgun carry permit with your photo

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you may obtain a free photo ID from the Department of Safety and Homeland Security at any participating driver service center. You may use the express service line at the driver service center to obtain your photo ID to minimize wait times. To obtain your ID, you will need the following:
- Proof of citizenship (such as a birth certificate)
- Two proofs of Tennessee residency (such as a voter registration card, a utility bill, vehicle registration or title, or bank statement)
- If your name differs from that on your primary ID, proof of the changed name (such as a certified marriage certificate, divorce decree, court order, etc.)
- If you cannot afford a copy of the documents required to obtain a free photo ID, you may sign a form stating under oath that you are indigent and have been unable to obtain an acceptable photo ID for voting without paying a fee.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you will vote a provisional ballot. You will then have two business days after Election Day to return to the election commission office to show a valid photo ID. Upon returning to the election commission office, you will sign an affidavit and a copy of your photo ID will be made to be reviewed by the counting board.

Tennessee offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 20 days prior to the election and ends 5 days before the election, or ends 7 days before a presidential preference primary.

You can pre-register to vote in Tennessee if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Tennessee has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party (Tennessee does not register political party). 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Tennessee does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Texas

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in Texas with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include: You will be away from your county on Election Day and during early voting; You are sick or disabled; You are 65 years of age or older on Election Day; or You are confined in jail, but eligible to vote.

Photo ID is required to vote in Texas. Valid forms of ID include:
- Texas Driver License issued by the Texas Department of Public Safety (DPS)
- Texas Election Identification Certificate issued by DPS
- Texas Personal Identification Card issued by DPS
- Texas Handgun License issued by DPS
- United States Military Identification Card containing the person’s photograph
- United States Citizenship Certificate containing the person’s photograph
- United States Passport (book or card)

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can submit an alternate form of ID along with a Reasonable Impediment Declaration. If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you will be allowed to complete a provisional ballot, and will then need to submit approved ID to the county voter registrar within 6 days for your ballot to be counted.

Texas offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins the 17th day before election day and ends the 4th day before election day.

You can pre-register to vote in Texas when you turn 17 years and 10 months old and will be 18 years old by Election Day.

Texas has open primaries. A registered voter can select which primary election they vote in. Once they vote in the primary, they affiliate with that party for the remainder of the year and cannot participate in another party’s primary runoff or convention process. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Texas does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Utah

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Utah; no excuse is needed. All registered voters in Utah should automatically receive absentee/vote-by-mail ballots at the address where they are registered.

ID is required to vote in person in Utah. Valid forms of ID include:
One primary form of ID that is valid (not expired) and has your name and photograph:
- Utah driver license
- ID card issued by the state of Utah or the US Government
- Utah concealed carry permit
- US passport
- Tribal ID card (does not require a photograph)

OR two forms of ID that, when combined, prove your name and current residence:
- Utility bill dated within 90 days of the election
- Bank or other financial account statement
- Certified birth certificate
- Valid Social Security card
- Check issued by the state or federal government
- Currently valid Utah hunting or fishing license
- Currently valid US military ID card
- Certified naturalization documents (NOT a green card)
- Certified copy of court records showing the voter’s adoption or name change
- Bureau of Indian Affairs card
- Tribal treaty card
- Medicaid or Medicare or Electronic Benefits Transfer card
- Currently valid ID card issued by a local government within Utah
- Currently valid ID card issued by an employer
- Currently valid ID card issued by a college, university, technical school, or professional school in Utah
- Current Utah vehicle registration

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you may vote a provisional ballot. The county clerk or election officer will determine the validity of the ballot.

Voting by mail has a different process for verifying voter identification. When voters register to vote for the first time, they are prompted to visit their county clerk's office to provide proof of valid identification. A mail ballot cannot be sent to a first time voter until identification is verified in-person. Once this identification is received and recorded, the voter is eligible to receive a mail ballot and will not need to provide photo identification when voting by mail in future elections.

Each time a voter submits a ballot by mail, the signature on that voter's ballot is verified against the signature that they provided their county clerk with when they initially registered. If the signatures do not match, the clerk reaches out to the voter to request that they appear in-person at the clerk's office to verify proper identification before the ballot can be counted.

Utah offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 14 days before election day and ends the Friday before election day, but early voting can be extended to the day before election day by a municipal clerk.

You can pre-register to vote in Utah when you turn 16.

Utah has semi-open and closed primaries. Only voters registered with the Republican Party may vote in that party's primary for both state and presidential primaries. Voters registered with the Democratic Party and unaffiliated voters may vote in the state Democratic Primary, while all registered voters regardless of party can vote in the presidential Democratic Primary. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Utah but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place on Election Day. You must provide identification and proof of residence, and you will be able to vote a provisional ballot.

Vermont

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Vermont; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in Vermont. If you are a first-time voter who registered by mail you will have to show ID to vote. Valid forms of ID include:
- Current and valid photo identification or bank statement
- Utility bill
- Government document that contains your name/current address.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can register to vote at your polling place.

Vermont offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting is available 45 days before a primary or general election and 20 days before a municipal election that uses the Australian ballot.

You can pre-register to vote in Vermont if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Vermont has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Vermont but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place on Election Day. You can also register at your town or city clerk's office on days preceding the election during regular business hours and on Election Day during polling hours.

Virginia

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Virginia; no excuse is needed.

ID is required to vote in Virginia. Valid forms of ID include:
- Voter confirmation documents you received after you registered to vote
- Virginia DMV-issued Driver’s License or Identification Card
- Valid United States Passport
- Any ID card issued by the US, Virginia, or a local Virginia government
- Any student ID card issued by a US university or community
- Valid student ID issued by a public school or private school in Virginia
- Employer-issued photo ID card
- Any current utility bill, bank statement, government check, paycheck, or other government document with your name and address
- An ID Confirmation Statement
-Valid Tribal ID

Virginia offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 45 days before election day.

You can pre-register to vote in Virginia when you turn 17 if you will turn 18 by the next general election.

Virginia has open primaries. Any registered voter may participate in any political party's primary election. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

Virginia does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Washington

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Washington; no excuse is needed. All registered voters in Washington should automatically receive absentee/vote-by-mail ballots at the address where they are registered.

ID is not required to vote by mail in Washington, with the exception of federal Help America Vote Act (HAVA) requirements for first-time voters. ID is required to vote in person in Washington. Valid Forms of ID include:
- driver's license
- state identification card
- student identification card
- tribal identification card
- employer identification card
If a voter does not have a valid ID, they may submit a provisional ballot which will be counted if the signature on the ballot matches the signature on their voter registration.

Washington offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 18 days before an election and ends the day before an election.

You can pre-register to vote in Washington when you turn 16.

Washington has open presidential primaries. Voters are not asked for party affiliation when registering to vote, and are only asked for a party declaration in presidential primaries -- however, this has no bearing on how a voter may vote in future presidential primaries. For all other primaries, Washington uses a top-two primary system that allows voters to choose among all candidates running for each office. The two candidates who receive the most votes in the Primary Election qualify for the General Election. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Washington but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your vote center during the early voting period and on Election Day.

West Virginia

COVID-19 UPDATE: All voters are currently eligible to vote absentee, as "Illness, injury or other medical reason" includes concerns for COVID-19.

Voters can only vote absentee/by mail in West Virginia with an approved excuse. Approved excuses include:
- Illness, injury or other medical reason
- Disability or advanced age
- Incarceration or home detention (does not include individuals convicted of any felony, treason, or election bribery)
- Work hours and distance from county seat
- Inaccessible early voting site and polling place
- Personal or business travel
- Attendance at college or other place of education or training
- Temporary residence outside of the county
- Service as an elected or appointed state or federal official
- Participation in the Address Confidentiality Program (ACP)
- Membership, or the spouse or dependent a member of the United States uniformed services and Merchant Marines on active duty

ID is required to vote in West Virginia. Valid forms of ID include:
- Voter registration card
- Medicare card or Social Security card
- Birth certificate
- WV hunting or fishing license
- WV SNAP ID card
- WV TANF program ID card
- WV Medicaid ID card
- Bank or debit card
- Utility bill or bank statement issued within six months of the date of the election
- Health insurance card issued to the voter
- WV driver’s license or other WV ID card issued by the DMV
- Driver’s license issued by another state
- U.S. passport or passport card
- Military ID card issued by the U.S.
- U.S. or WV Government employee ID card
- Student ID card
- A concealed carry (pistol/revolver) permit

Exemptions to the ID requirement are:
1. Signed, sworn statement by an adult who has known the voter for 6 months or more
2. A poll worker knows the voter
3. Residents of State Care Facilities

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can apply for a free Voter ID Card from your county clerk. Applications must be submitted in person at the county clerk’s office, and voters can choose to be mailed their Voter ID Card or pick them up at the county clerk’s office.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can vote a provisional ballot. Before canvass, the provisional ballot signature is compared to the voter’s registration signature. If the signatures match, the vote should count.

West Virginia offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Early voting begins 13 days before the election and ends 3 days before the election.

You can pre-register to vote in West Virginia when you turn 17 if you will turn 18 by the next general election.

West Virginia has semi-open primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary, but unaffiliated voters may choose any primary ballot. 17-year-olds can vote in the primary election if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

West Virginia does not offer Election Day registration, so be sure to submit your voter registration before the deadline.

Wisconsin

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Wisconsin; no excuse is needed.

Photo ID is required to vote in Wisconsin. Valid forms of ID include:

The following photo IDs are acceptable for voting purposes, and can be unexpired or expired after the date of the most recent general election (currently, the November 6, 2018 election):
- A Wisconsin DOT-issued driver license, even if driving privileges are revoked or suspended
- A Wisconsin DOT-issued identification card
- A Military ID card issued by the U.S. Uniformed Services (including retired and dependent uniformed service IDs)
- A U.S. passport book or card

The following photo IDs are also acceptable for voting purposes:
- A certificate of naturalization (that was issued no earlier than two years before the date of the election)
- An identification card issued by a federally recognized Indian tribe in Wisconsin (can be expired or unexpired)
- A driver license receipt issued by Wisconsin DOT (valid for 45 days from date issued)
- An identification card receipt issued by Wisconsin DOT (valid for 45 days from date issued)
- A Wisconsin DMV ID Petition Process Photo Receipt (valid for 180 days from date issued)
- A Veteran Affairs ID card (must be unexpired or have no expiration date)
- A photo identification card issued by a Wisconsin accredited university or college, or technical college that contains the following: Date the card was issued, Signature of student, Expiration date no later than two years after date of issuance (card may be expired). The university or college ID must be accompanied by a separate document that proves enrollment, such as a tuition fee receipt, enrollment verification letter, or class schedule. Enrollment verification document can be shown electronically.

If you do not have an approved form of ID, you can get a free state ID card. You will need to show proof of identity, proof of citizenship or legal status, proof of Wisconsin residency, and proof of name and date of birth.

If you go to your polling place without an approved form of ID, you can vote a provisional ballot. You must present proof of identification to the municipal clerk no later than 4:00 p.m. Friday.

Wisconsin offers in-person early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. To find the dates and times of early voting, voters should contact their municipal clerk's office.

You can pre-register to vote in Wisconsin if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Wisconsin has open primaries. Any registered voter can participate in primary elections, regardless of political party. 17-year-olds cannot vote in the primary election even if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Wisconsin but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at your polling place on Election Day.

Wyoming

All voters are eligible to vote absentee/by mail in Wyoming; no excuse is needed.

ID is not required to vote in Wyoming. However, if you registered by mail and are voting in a federal election for the first time, you must show photo ID or a document that has both your name and residence address. Valid forms of ID include:

One of the following:
- United States Passport
- Valid driver’s license or ID card issued by any state
- ID issued by a federal, state or local government/agency
- Photo ID card issued by the University of Wyoming, a Wyoming community college, or a Wyoming public school
- United States Military ID
- ID card issued to a Dependent of a member of the United States Armed Forces.

OR any two or more of the following:
- Certification of United States Citizenship
- Certificate of Naturalization
- United States Military Draft Record
- Voter’s Registration Card from another State or County
- United States Social Security Card
- Certification of Birth Abroad issued by the Department of State
Original or certified copy of a birth certificate bearing an official seal
- Any other form of identification issued by an official agency of the U.S. or a State

In the event of a challenge, if the residence address is not included in the document or if it is not current, then you may be required to produce other documentation of your residence address. In the event of a challenge, the following documents, showing your name and address, are acceptable proof of identity and residency:
- Current utility bill
- Current bank statement;
- Current government check;
- Current paycheck; or
- Any other current government document showing your name and address.

If you are refused the right to vote, you may vote a provisional ballot. In order for your vote to be counted, you must provide proof of your eligibility to vote to the county clerk no later than close of business the day following the election.

Wyoming offers early voting. No excuse is needed to vote early. Voters may return their absentee ballots until 7 PM on election day.

You can pre-register to vote in Wyoming if you will turn 18 by the next election.

Wyoming has closed primaries. Voters registered with a particular party may only vote in that party's primary. However, voters can change their party affiliation on Election Day. 17-year-olds can participate in the Democratic presidential caucus if they will be 18 by the corresponding general election.

If you’re eligible to vote in Wyoming but have not yet registered, you can register and vote at the office of the county clerk during the two week period after the registration deadline or at your polling place on Election Day.